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Tanzania

2 aircraft
6 staff
31 destinations
17 partner organisations


The Challenge

Tanzania has one of the highest numbers of new-born fatalities in the world. Each year, 39,000 babies die before reaching their first birthday; 8,000 Tanzanian mothers die during labour each year.

Diseases which are highly prevalent in the country include hepatitis A, typhoid, dengue fever and rabies and are the largest killer of children in Tanzania. In rural areas, the need to pay medical fees upfront often deters people from accessing treatment until it is too late. This in turn magnifies many outbreaks of infectious diseases.

Much has been achieved by the people of Tanzania, the government and the outside world towards boosting the country’s development. However, two-thirds of the population live outside the larger towns and cities. Those living in the remotest parts of Tanzania still need substantial support, as vast areas of the country have no functional transport system and are only accessible through long, dangerous and difficult-to-navigate journeys. In the dry season, the network of dirt roads is poorly maintained. During the wet season, many roads become completely impassable, leaving many communities completely isolated for months at a time. These challenges are greatest in the underdeveloped northern and southern regions.



Our Operation

MAF flights focus on bringing physical transformation and Christian hope to communities in the northwest and centre of the country. Much of the flying centres on medical and evangelistic ‘safaris’ (Swahili for a trip) - each month transporting teams to isolated villages: • The four-day Haydom Medical Safari ensures six isolated villages have access to a doctor and healthcare teams once a month • The Kilimatinde Safari has a monthly three-day programme supporting national evangelism and healthcare teams • The South Maasai Safari flights support national evangelism and healthcare teams serving in the under-developed South Maasai region A high priority during these visit is to meet the needs of pregnant women and children, including the administration of vaccinations. • The monthly Malambo Safari is a three-day programme supporting the church diocese, flying Maasai pastors and evangelists to visit numerous communities to minister to their fellow Maasai in the region.

Partnership with other organisations include Help for the Massai and KCCO (Kilimanjaro centre for community ophthalmology) which has led to eye clinics being introduced in the Malambo area.

Quote: ‘Through MAF we are working for two days the work that would otherwise take one month to cover.’ Rev. Isaya Ole-Lee, Pastor for Malambo